Joy Cooksey, Georgina Blyth, Warwick Sherman, Paul Duncan, Cliff Graham, David Gordon, Col Shephard, Ian MacDonald

Joy Cooksey, Georgina Blyth, Warwick Sherman, Paul Duncan, Cliff Graham, David Gordon, Col Shephard, Ian MacDonald

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Another peril of red-green colour blindness (C8) from David Gordon of Cranebrook, who remembers a uni colleague talking about his electrician father, who was red-green colour blind back in the days when the active electrical wire was red and the earth wire was green. “His dad used to test the wires with the back of his hand — the wire that had the kick was active.” Thankfully not as hair-raising an experience these days with active wires being brown, and earth wires yellow and green stripe.

Georgina Blyth of Goolmangar thought having a bright yellow car would be safer, with many people also advising that yellow was the safest car colour (C8) because it stood out from all others. “However, within six months of ownership, the bonnet of my car was walked across by a cow, someone backed into me in a carpark and then someone else ran into the back of my car at a roundabout. Fortunately, I think it would be the least likely car to be stolen.”

“On most of our winding ‘dirt’ roads, car visibility does not rely on car colour (C8),” writes Joy Cooksey of Harrington. “It depends on the size of the dust cloud an oncoming vehicle is able to throw up.”

“When delicate young ears were within earshot, the expression used was that someone had SOL,” says Col Shephard of Yamba of George Manojlovic’s liver saying (C8). Not just delicate young ears, apparently. Ian MacDonald of Newport “married into a family who described anyone who was grumpy as suffering from ‘deep SOL’. I’m not even sure they all knew what it stood for.”

Cliff Graham of Cherrybrook can attest to the popularity of liver pills (C8) as a cure-all. “While attending the then NSW University of Technology in the 1950s and feeling off, I followed my mother’s advice and took a Carters Little Liver Pill. The result was spectacular. I spent the day on the toilet, missed the lectures and forgot the illness.”