Peter Carruthers, Jim Pollitt, Ken Dundas, Meri Will, David Le Cornu, Elizabeth Wiedemann, Peter Wheeler, Paul Hummerston,

Peter Carruthers, Jim Pollitt, Ken Dundas, Meri Will, David Le Cornu, Elizabeth Wiedemann, Peter Wheeler, Paul Hummerston,

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According to Paul Hummerston of Longueville, it is not only real estate agents who are given to hyperbole when describing slightly less than desirable locations (C8). “Many a young and foolish soldier (or officer) has been misled by their career advisor who informed them that Puckapunyal was the Tuscany of the south.”

Today’s earworm is brought to you by Jim Pollitt of Wahroonga, who reminds us that “Jolene has eyes of emerald green (C8)”.

Green eyes, blue eyes, red eyes, black eyes (C8): it doesn’t make any difference to Ken Dundas of Banora Point. “My favourite has always been bull’s-eyes.”

In a similar vein to Bernie Carberry’s Ohm’s law rhyme (C8), Peter Carruthers of Carlingford writes that junior high school maths classes are also taught: “Hey diddle diddle, the median’s the middle, you add and divide for the mean, the mode is the one you see the most, and the range is the difference between.”

Being dyslexic, Elizabeth Wiedemann of Ermington also knew and used Bernie’s rhyme to remember the Ohm’s law formula (C8), “until I quoted it one day and a very mean fellow student immediately chimed in with, ‘Little star up in the sky, power equals R squared I’. That was over fifty years ago and I still get confused over which is correct. I haven’t forgiven him yet either”.